Thursday, 31 July 2008

Winston isn't a conspiracy theorist: Yeah Right




From Whaleoil


Where's the proof? says Peters Video
Peters addresses allegations in Parliament Video

The Winston Peters saga keep rolling on and getting even worse for the great one.

In Parliament today he had a set to with Rodney Hide, questioning him at one point on the validity of a former girlfriend.

It really is embarrassing to see a member make a fool of himself so much but not think he is foolish in doing so.

There were more revelations today over undeclared donations back in 1999. This is in addition to a secret $100,000.00 plus gift from Owen Glenn, 10s of thousands from the Vela family and over 100,000.00 solicited by Peters from Sir Bob Jones.

Mad Hatter indeed.


Related Political Animal reading

Winston Peters lost in Wonderland
Winston Circus hangover continues
Discretion was the essential part of Vela Donation
Winston Peter's Glenn donation scandal: But wait, there is more!
Peter's hangs himself in February Paul Henry Interview
Peter's admits lying about Glenn donation
Winston's silence is telling
Labour gets tangled in Peter's lies
Leaked Glenn Email
Winston got secret donations from Owen Glenn
The Owen Glenn Story: Singing the same tune but hitting a bum note

c Political Animal 2008

Mikey loves Iti


c NZPA 2008

Much political capital was made last year by the Labour Party and mainstream media when John Key was seen to Hongi with Tama Iti. A criminal facing arms charges Labour called Iti, the John Key Hongi they said supported and legitimised a criminal.

What gives?

It doesn't really matter in the great scheme of things but Cullen especially, does have a record of saying and doing things after telling others they shouldn't.

Witness the meagre tax cuts he passed before the coming election. He has been saying for 9 years that the tax cuts that National have proposed were evidence of a morally bankrupt party and an "election bribe".

The Iti/Cullen love fest is just more of the same.

Can anyone tell me how you can recompense a party (buy maaaoorii votes) who didn't sign a contract(The Treaty of Waitangi) for perceived grievances related to that contract?

A contract these days it aint worth the paper it is written on(The Sonny B defence) and if you dont have a contract you get the benefits of having signed one anyway.

Ahh well, I might just sign up for that write off of $40000.00 in debt that Labour are contemplating, making it easier to break contracts with debtors.

Will someone gag me with a spoon, before socialism does.

c Political Animal 2008

Wednesday, 30 July 2008

Winston Peters lost in Wonderland



Rodney Hide (left) and Winston Peters. Photos / Michael Craig, Greg Bowker

Rodney Hide (left) and Winston Peters.


Winston Peters used a couple of quotes from Alice In Wonderland in his members speech less than an hour ago.

One quote he used was directed at journalists and politicians from the National Party and its central meaning goes something like this:

If you don't know what you are talking about shut your mouth.
Winston Peters, July 30 2008

I would counter that with another quote from Alice in Wonderland, made by Alice herself. It is a direct quote:

"If I had a world of my own, everything would be nonsense. Nothing would be what it is, because everything would be what it isn't. And contrary wise, what is, it wouldn't be. And what it wouldn't be, it would. You see?"
Alice

While we are quoting Alice in Wonderland, It is clear that Winston Peters has been taking his response to serious accusations of corruption, bribery and secret donations from a fairy tale.

In his members speech today he attacked the media, opposition politicians, and went into great detail. When asked where donations to his party went though-why secret donations were not declared, who they came from and what was done for the donors to get the donations, Winnie the Pooh is deathly silent.

Peters clearly lives in a world where up is down, down is up, black is white, white is black and secret donations to an individual or party are not really donations but gifts of little consequence.

Back to Alice.


"What is the use of a book, without pictures or conversations?"
Alice

Helen Clark should be asking for more from Peters but continues to live in Wonderland herself. She simply wants to stay in power.

This leaves the public asking themselves when they will get answer from Winston Peters and Helen Clark. It leaves us all feeling:

"Curiouser and curiouser!"
Alice

The last word though should be left to the Mock Turtle from Alice In Wonderland, for it sums up our collective thinking to Winston Peters and his denial of corruption in the face of clear evidence and his repetition of an attack mantra upon his accusers.

"What is the use of repeating all that stuff, if you don't explain it as you go on? It's by far the most confusing thing I ever heard!"
The Mock Turtle



Related Political Animal reading


Winston Circus hangover continues
Discretion was the essential part of Vela Donation
Winston Peter's Glenn donation scandal: But wait, there is more!
Peter's hangs himself in February Paul Henry Interview
Peter's admits lying about Glenn donation
Winston's silence is telling
Labour gets tangled in Peter's lies
Leaked Glenn Email
Winston got secret donations from Owen Glenn
The Owen Glenn Story: Singing the same tune but hitting a bum note

c Political Animal 2008

Tuesday, 29 July 2008

The Winston Circus hangover continues

Winston Peters

Winston Peters

Peters faces questions over donations in Parliament

"This whole affair is a shameful episode of dirty politics."


Winston Peters July 29 2008



You bet it is, but it is Winston Peters that has made the scandal over his secret donations "shameful" and "dirty".

In the face of overwhelming evidence to the contrary, that Peters has in fact accepted secret donations from wealthy backers, this Minister has fudged the whole issue and wiggled out of the crapper by obfuscation, omission of fact and legalese. Everything but the truth.

Peters has lied. That is clear to most, except the Prime Minister, who has given her full backing to to him so she and her Labour Party can keep their last grip on power, which is quickly slipping from their fingers.

In Parliament today Peters continued the circus and came out against National's Craig Foss for having a conflict of interest owning shares and Greens co-leader Russel Norman for having an affair. Vintage Peters.

He refused to clear up the mounting accusations made against him.

The minority Labour government would topple if Peters was sacked for his failure to clear up his corrupt actions and Clarks already tattered reputation for her own law breaking and lies is further stretched because of her support for her Foreign Minister.

Corruption like this would lead to the sacking of most individuals in private employment situations.

It appears once again though that politicians, especially those from the left, are exceptions to this accepted rule.

Related Political Animal reading

Discretion was the essential part of Vela Donation
Winston Peter's Glenn donation scandal: But wait, there is more!
Peter's hangs himself in February Paul Henry Interview
Peter's admits lying about Glenn donation
Winston's silence is telling
Labour gets tangled in Peter's lies
Leaked Glenn Email
Winston got secret donations from Owen Glenn
The Owen Glenn Story: Singing the same tune but hitting a bum note

c Political Animal 2008

NZ Herald Digipoll: July 29 2008

The latest political poll shows the trend that started in polls from August 2007. A wide gap of support between National and Labour. National has been ahead in the majority of polls since that date and has consistently polled above a 20 point lead over Labour.

There were several polls out 9 days ago that suggested a claw back by Labour but the Roy Morgan Poll from that weekend showed the continued trend that today's Herald Digipoll shows.

Labour's destruction in the 2008 election.

It will be very interesting to see polls out after the scandal surrounding Winston Peters and his corrupt secret donations from big business and Helen Clarks tacit support for him and this corruption.



5:00AM Tuesday July 29, 2008
By Paula Oliver
John Key has a 3.1 per cent lead over Helen Clark in the preferred PM stakes. Photos / Alan Gibson, Sarah Ivey

John Key has a 3.1 per cent lead over Helen Clark in the preferred PM stakes. Photos / Alan Gibson, Sarah Ivey

National has widened its lead in this month's Herald-DigiPoll survey, recording its highest support in a year, while Labour has dropped to just above 30 per cent with the election no more than 3 1/2 months away.

The poll is the first to be completed since New Zealand First leader Winston Peters became embroiled in fund-raising controversies, but his party has gained slightly and his personal rating has dropped only marginally.

National leads Labour by 24.6 percentage points - reversing signs of a Government comeback in other polls.

National has risen half a percentage point since June to 55.4 per cent support, while Labour has dropped 1.6 points to 30.8.

The only other party to get across the crucial 5 per cent threshold to enter Parliament is the Greens, with 5.5 per cent. But New Zealand First, at 4.1 per cent, is edging closer.

National would govern alone if the poll were translated into seats. The election must be held by November 15.

Continued

Related Political Animal reading

TV One Colmar Brunton Poll: July 20 2008
TV3 News Poll: July 20 2008
Fairfax Neilson Poll: July 19 2008
Roy Morgan Poll: July 18 2008

c Political Animal 2008

Sunday, 27 July 2008

NZ HERALD: John Key-Part two

3:00PM Saturday July 26, 2008By Carroll du Chateau, Paula Oliver and Eugene Bingham

Key giving his State of the Nation speech this year. Photo / Martin Sykes


Part One of the John Key story
John Key in photos
John Key in his own words
Parliament's $50m MP
'I'm more liberal than I look'
John Key Timeline

For someone whose career had been a series of champagne glass-chinking highs, John Key's first day in Parliament was a shock. Flushed with his victory in Helensville, he was almost jumping out of his skin at the chance to get started on the next part of his life plan. The first day of his journey to be Prime Minister.

And he walked into a blood bath.

The country had been brutal in its judgment of National in 2002, its support on polling day collapsing to 20.9 per cent, the 66-year-old party's worst-ever election result.

Amid the carnage, Key had been the bright spot. Auckland's Westies had reacted well to the new face with its big smile and a man willing to roll up his sleeves and hammer together his own hoardings. As it had earlier in his life, Key's self-confidence and willingness had paid off, and he won the Helensville seat by 1705 votes.

On the Tuesday morning following the election, Key flew to Wellington for his first caucus meeting. "I went in feeling euphoric and left feeling depressed," he recalls.

The departing MPs, some retiring, many defeated, stepped up to receive their farewell gift (a silver tray), said their farewells, and left. The survivors and the few newcomers - Key, Don Brash, Judith Collins, Brian Connell and Sandra Goudie - huddled together.

It was a sober introduction to Parliamentary life for this retired merchant banker. Last week, in part one of this project, we told his background story, the steps he took to reach Parliament. This week we examine Key's rise to the top of the party and explore what he stands for.

Key achieved his goal of getting elected, even as voters mauled his party. His longer term ambition to be Prime Minister is now within reach. But which John Key will emerge? The centrist figure who has embraced so many existing policies that his critics label "Labour-lite"; or the career banker and money-man, who linked fast economic growth with fewer holidays for workers (two weeks' annual leave, in fact), said he could not see any reason to own Air New Zealand, and accused some DPB mothers of "breeding for business".

In a little more than three months, New Zealanders will know if Key occupies the Beehive. The bigger question is will they know what to expect from him? In this, the second part of our far-reaching examination of the 46-year-old, we push past the window dressing to reveal what he believes in and how he operates.

We have read hundreds of Key's speeches, trawled through the Parliamentary records of his questions to ministers, and pored over interview transcripts dating back to the start of his political career. As well, we have interviewed dozens of MPs, including those from other parties in an attempt to glean as full a picture as possible. Those interviews are among about 100 we have now undertaken as part of this project.



Related Political Animal reading

Part One of the John Key story


View as a single page

c Political Animal 2008

Saturday, 26 July 2008

Images of the week: Winnie's merry dance




From Stuff.co.nz Ahh, my only friend.



The relief from the media storm that hit Winston Peters on his return from Singapore is written all over his face in this picture of himself and his new mate Condelezza Rice.



Peters after facing media on his return to NZ from Singapore, showing the strain.








If Peter's corrupt practices werent so serious his performance would be one of the great stand up comedy acts rivaling the Flight of the Conchords and John Clarke combined.


c Political Animal 2008

Vote on the Political Animal Pre-Election Poll

Vote on the Political Animal Pre election poll.

So far votes are heavily in favour of a National Party landslide, with an average vote of 56%, with Labour behind on around 12% of the vote. Act comes a close third.

You have two votes of course. Some haven't voted in both P. A. polls but there is your Party vote and Constituency vote to cast.

Vote below on Political Animal Pre-Election Poll - remeber you have two votes

Party Vote



2008 New Zealand General Election - Check your enrolment status


Friday, 25 July 2008

John Key's success should be celebrated

The 2008 NBR Rich List is out. I suspect most Leftists will be looking at the list with a large amount of jealousy and an unhealthy level of suspicion.

Your Eric Watsons and Michael Fays of the list do have a huge amount of tarnish to their wealth. Watson behind more losses for investors, including the recent Hanover Finance collapse, than the All Blacks at World Cups and Fay milking New Zealand Taxpayer assets for his own personal joy, but most on the list got there because of intelligence, a small quotient of luck and most of all a great deal of hard work and stubborn perseverance.

I myself look at such people with a positive curiosity. I don't think, who did you rip off to get where you are but how did you manage to get where you are?

We got alot of political capital made today from the left, about a possible future Prime Minister, in John Key, about being at number 167 on the list with a personal fortune of around NZ50 million, but being a success in life and coming from such humble beginnings, like the number one lister, Graeme Hart, will make Key excellent Priministerial material.

Key is aspirational as Helen Clark is institutional. People like Key should be held up as examples to others of how success can come from hard work and if even if your background is poor economically, as John's was, you can still get there without having to rely on the State for life, as Clark would have someone like Key and his mother, dependent rather than independent.

In these tough economic times, that Labour have made considerably worse by their high taxes and wasteful spending, we need a leader that understands economics, markets and how business works and functions, something that is a mystery to most in the Labour Party, and especially Michael Cullen and Helen Clark.

John Key's financial acumen will be a benefit to the country and his success in life is clear evidence that he is the right man for the number one job in New Zealand.

Related Political Animal reading

Pointing fingers in the playground

c Political Animal 2008

Take an early poll Helen

The latest outburst by Winston Peters today at a press conference staged by him to defend the indefensible; the Owen Glenn, Vela and Bob Jones donations, all clearly made and all clearly denied in various degrees by Peters comes at a crucial time for Peters, his NZ First Party and Helen Clark and the Labour Party.



Winston Peters denies any wrongdoing TV3
Statement from Winston Peters
Winston Peters faces media


The accusations made against Winston Peters, with written proof in all three cases, are sackable offences for a Cabinet Minister under the terms of Labour's own cabinet manual.

But with some crucial Labour legislation, like the economy wrecking Carbon Credit trading law to pass before an election, the Prime Minister wont push Peters because it will mean an early election.

More proof of course that Clarks politics and lust for power have preference over rules, the country and its laws.


Related Political Animal reading

I didn't give Winston Peters a donation

Discretion was the essential part of Vela Donation
Winston Peter's Glenn donation scandal: But wait, there is more!
Peter's hangs himself in February Paul Henry Interview
Peter's admits lying about Glenn donation
Winston's silence is telling
Labour gets tangled in Peter's lies
Leaked Glenn Email
Winston got secret donations from Owen Glenn

c Political Animal 2008

Thursday, 24 July 2008

I didn't give Winston Peters a donation


c Blanch 2008

OK, who in New Zealand didn't give little Winnie a secret donation in the past?

Faster than you can say Hanover Finance has gone bust, the latest revelation from the Dom Post is that Bob Jones has given secret money to a trust administered by Winston Peters brother .

The donation has not been declared to election officials.

Like Labour, Winston Peter's NZ First has railed heavily against secret donations from wealthy individuals and companies but has nevertheless been at the centre of controversy himself by accepting secret money from Owen Glenn, the Vela Family and now Sir Bobby.

Last year Peters and Labour were at the centre of the passing of the Electoral Finance Act, an act they contended would stop these sorts of donations in the future.

In particular, fingers were pointed at the National Party over "big money" buying favours for their donors, but the fingers have clearly been pointing right back.

There is nothing like a little bit of hypocrisy to get the mind focused.


Related Political Animal reading

I think I love you Sir Bobby
Discretion was the essential part of Vela Donation
Winston Peter's Glenn donation scandal: But wait, there is more!
Peter's hangs himself in February Paul Henry Interview
Peter's admits lying about Glenn donation
Winston's silence is telling
Labour gets tangled in Peter's lies
Leaked Glenn Email
Winston got secret donations from Owen Glenn
The Owen Glenn Story: Singing the same tune but hitting a bum note

c Political Animal 2008

Tuesday, 22 July 2008

Close up Video[July 22] Peters on the attack!

http://images.tvnz.co.nz/tvnz_images/news2008/close_up/cu_winston_280208_232.jpg


WATCH INTERVIEW Close Up: Winston Peters-22 July 2008 (7:01)



The TV One, Winston Peters interview,live from Singapore, by Mark Sainsbury today, was more of the same bluster and invective from an individual on the ropes and going down for the count.

Peters denied that he received more that $NZ10000.00 from the Vela family, even though the Dom Post have evidence that the family have gifted $150,000.00 to Peter's interests.

He attacked the media again and said the latest accusations were "lies" made up by the media.

Watch the manila folder flapping incessantly through the whole 7 minutes of the interview.

He is usually unflappable.

Peters ended the interview with a wait till I get home taunt to his accusers.

I cant wait.


Related Political Animal Reading

Discretion was the essential part of Vela Donation
Winston Peter's Glenn donation scandal: But wait, there is more!
Peter's hangs himself in February Paul Henry Interview
Peter's admits lying about Glenn donation
Winston's silence is telling
Labour gets tangled in Peter's lies
Leaked Glenn Email
Winston got secret donations from Owen Glenn


c Political Animal 2008

Discretion was the essential part of Vela Donations

The better part of valor is discretion, in the which better part I have saved my life.
William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616), 'King Henry IV part I'

Well, Peters has been discreet, until found out by the NZ Herald and the Dom Post, but his fighting spirit in the face of political danger hasn't been for the better when it comes to his survival. Helen Clark's support of him is neither discreet or advantageous to her or her party.

In Parliament today Helen Clark defended Winston Peters (Video) to the hilt.

This is in spite of overwhelming evidence that Peters took secret money from Owen Glenn, spent NZ $45,000.00 of taxpayers money on his lawyer and accepted NZ$150,000.00 from the Vela Family, a wealthy family with interests in the racing and fishing industry.

Peters is the Minister for racing and gave tax breaks to the equine industry last year.

Giving backing for Peters leaves Helen Clark in a difficult position. In supporting him she has given approval for his behaviour and as he is part of the minority government it is really incumbent on her to make a move on Peters to remove him from his position.

She has done it with countless MPs over the years who have strayed from legal or moral lines and there have been many.

However, her Party relies upon Peters to support Labour's wafer thin grip on Parliament so it is unlikely she will do anything unless she has to.

It could lead to an early election if she puts Winnie's nose out of joint.

Coming on top of secret donations from Owen Glenn to Labour, revealed earlier this year, and Labour and NZ First campaigning heavily on secret donations in relation to their passing of the Electoral Finance Act, Ms Clark has a orgasm of egg all over her face given her support for her Partner in Parliament, Mr Winston Peters.


Related Political Animal Reading

Winston Peter's Glenn donation scandal: But wait, there is more!
Peter's hangs himself in February Paul Henry Interview
Peter's admits lying about Glenn donation
Winston's silence is telling
Labour gets tangled in Peter's lies
Leaked Glenn Email
Winston got secret donations from Owen Glenn

NZ Herald Link

Helen Clark defending Winston Peters in Parliament today-Video

c Political Animal 2008


Winston Peter's Glenn donation scandal: But wait theres more!


Seems the Dom Post has been digging for gold over the Winston Peters secret donations scandal as well as the NZ Herald, who kicked it all off a week ago.

The latest revelation is that Peters has received money from the Vela family, owners of large fishing and racing interests in New Zealand.

It is thought that the Vela Family could have given up to NZ$150,000.00 and it hasn't been disclosed and must be. Donations have been made in amounts under $10,000.00 so don't have to be disclosed when made separately. Again big money going to a politician who has campaigned against the National Party for doing similar things.

The donations do not appear in NZ First's annual declarations to the Electoral Commission. A clear breach of electoral law if it is true.

The Dom Post hasn't made a direct comment on the fact that Peters has had donations from a family deeply involved in the racing industry while at the same time Peters is the Minister for racing. Political Animal will. That is corruption at the highest level, even if Peters latest donations are legal.

A second revelation by the Dom Post has been that Mr Henry, Peters Lawyer, also received at least $45,000 for legal services - paid for by Parliamentary Service funds last year.

Winston has replied in typical fashion that taxpayer money has been used to pay his legal bills:

"That is a lie."

MPs Rodney Hide and Gordon Copeland have taken a breach of privilege over Peter's secret Glenn donations to the speaker of the house, Margaret Wilson, while John Key asked Winston to apologise for misleading the public, too soft for my liking, and our great leader, Helen Clark, backs Winston all the way - why wouldn't she, her party has been arse deep in the same sort of corrupt practices.

In characteristic political fashion, something he has no doubt learnt from Helen Clark, Peters is leaving the country on another bauble filled junket.

He hasn't given a press conference, as is his want, to clear things up, so will get away with commenting until he gets back.


Related Political Animal Reading

Peter's hangs himself in February Paul Henry Interview
Peter's admits lying about Glenn donation
Winston's silence is telling
Labour gets tangled in Peter's lies
Leaked Glenn Email
Winston got secret donations from Owen Glenn

c Political Animal 2008

Monday, 21 July 2008

Peters hangs himself in February Paul Henry Interview




Back when the shite first hit the fan over Labour accepting secret donations from billionaire Owen Glenn, Winston Peters was grilled on TV One's Close Up about possible donations to NZ First.

In this interview he states at one point,in reference to being accused of accepting donations from Owen Glenn by the NZ Herald, again, " the story is categorically, emphatically and palpably untrue.

There is much more on this video pertinent to the current Peters/Glenn payola scandal, including references and reaction to Dale Jones, Party President, admitting that "there could have been a donation made".

Make your own mind up.

Peters clearly cant.


Related Political Animal Reading

Peter's admits lying about Glenn donation
Winston's silence is telling
Labour gets tangled in Peter's lies
Leaked Glenn Email
Winston got secret donations from Owen Glenn

c Political Animal 2008

Cost of Labour's 2008 Election bribes

I thought it would be very interesting to see the cost of Labour's election bribes so far.

A good concise list of what it is they are spending the money on, and how much it will cost the working taxpayer.

Some of it might be legitimate, some of it bordering on legit but most will be out and out handouts to prospective Labour voters.

Lets take a look.

1. KiwiRail purchase - cost NZ $665 million, plus hundreds of millions to "upgrade it" and keep it running. Altogether, including missed economic growth from keeping the money in taxpayers hands, $2 billion plus. Election bribe.

2. $10 billion in "tax cuts" mostly focused on those on welfare-working for families -and at an average of $16 per person hardly worth legislating for. Election bribe.

3. Increase in working for families-$200 million plus per year, 600 million over a 3 year term. Election bribe.

4. 1.7 Billion in lost capital value for Auckland International Airport shareholders because Labour stopped the sale of this private asset to buy votes. Election bribe.

5. Corporate welfare for research and development, cost $700 million. Election bribe.

6.Universal student allowances. Cost $728 million. Mooted but it will go ahead. Election bribe.

7. South Auckland "University". Cost, $25 million to purchase land and hundreds of millions more to develop. Not needed as Auckland already has 4 universities. Election Bribe.

8. Mt Eden Prison, Cost, well north of $250 million and unnecessary. Bunk beds will do. Election bribe.

Other costs with some merit but nonetheless some of the better ones could have been done earlier in Labour's term.


* $750 million in new health spending (includes first year of $160 million announced over weekend for elective services).

* $621 million in total over five years to boost Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade.

* $446 million over four years to boost funding for community organisations.*
.
* $164.2 million over five years for a cervical cancer immunisation programme.

* $150 million a year on educational changes to keep young people in school or training until they are 18.


The cost so far to the taxpayer?

Just over $18,000,000,000.00 , that is Billion with a capital B folks. You will have to pay this out of your taxes should Labour buy their way into power.

Keep checking back. I will update this list as the election grows nearer and Labour gets more desperate and disparate.


Related Political animal reading

At least Robin Hood was honest
Labour's State control out of control

c Political Animal 2008

Winston Peter's nose continues to grow


Winston Peters, caught out lying 2 weeks ago when email evidence confirmed that he and or his party, NZ First, had received donations from Owen Glenn, the billionaire from Monaco, denied the initial accusation revealed by Audrey Young from the NZ Herald.

This was after denials made by Peters earlier this year when secret donations from Glenn to the Labour Party were revealed.

On Friday 18 July came the bombshell that Peters said he found out from his lawyer "at 5.00pm that day" that Peters had indeed received money from Glenn for legal action taken by Peters after he challenged his big loss against National's Bill Clarkson, in the Tauranga electorate at the 2005 Election.

The twist with Peters though is that even after he was revealed as a liar the second time, himself, he now says because the money from Glenn was used to pay "an existing legal bill" it is neither he or his party that had received the donation:

Asked about pecuniary gain, Mr Peters told NZPA he did not believe he had benefited personally from the arrangement whereby his legal bills were paid by anonymous donors and he paid the shortfall.

Mr Henry(Peter's lawyer) concurred last night.

"There is nothing I am aware of where someone contributing towards a bill you have incurred needs to be declared."

Peters is in effect creating a "third entity", in the existing legal account outstanding, to dodge the fact that he was a beneficiary of Owen Glenn's largess. Legalese at its most immoral and repugnant, just like Peters stance over this matter.

What is even worse is that Peters, uncovered as a liar by Audrey Young is still being called a liar herself by Peters because she wont reveal the email evidence she has. Peters had contended last week that Young and the NZ Herald had "made it up" owed him an apology and should resign from the paper.

This kind of tough stance by Peters is characteristic of him and his political and legal past, in his long winded "winebox" saga especially. He has demanded jail, fines, apologies resignations and sackings against his political foes in the past, for imagined and actual corruption and lies.

It is a shame Winston Peters doesn't look in the mirror past his shallow facade.

Related Political Animal Reading



c Political Animal 2008, c Emmerson 2008

Sunday, 20 July 2008

TV One, Colmar Brunton Poll: 20 July 2008

Jul 20, 2008 6:31 PM

Labour has had a rare burst of good news with a bounce back in the latest ONE News Colmar Brunton poll.

But the party still has a mountain to climb before the election and for Winston Peters and New Zealand First, the numbers don't stack up.

National has fallen a little in the poll but still has a clear majority over Labour which had a six point lift to take it back into the mid-30s.

National, 52%, is well ahead of Labour on 35% while the Green Party polled 6%. None of the other minor parties reached the 5% threshold this month.

National with 65 seats could still govern alone on these numbers which would leave Labour in opposition with 44 seats, along with the Greens with seven.

Assuming they win their electorate seats the Maori Party (1.7%) would have four seats, Act (1.2%) two and United Future and the Progressives one seat each. Without a seat New Zealand First (2.4%) would be out of parliament.

The party National leader John Key is preferred prime minister on 38% with Helen Clark firmly in second place on 31%. Just 4% think the job should go to the next highest contender, Winston Peters.

The poll is a reality check for National which has begun revealing its policy - including opening up the Accident Compensation Corporation for competition and reintroducing a 90 day trial period for new staff in small firms.

The poll of 1000 eligible voters has a margin of error of plus or minus 3.1%.

Related Political Animal reading (this weekend's polls)

TV3 News Poll: July 20 2008
Fairfax Neilson Poll: July 19 2008
Roy Morgan Poll: July 18 2008

c Political Animal 2008

TV3 NEWS POLL: 20 July 2008

Watch Video


Sun, 20 Jul 2008 6:55p.m.

The National Party could govern with unbridled power on the evidence of tonight's 3 News political poll. However the gap has closed slightly between Labour and National.

The Labour Party's attacks on National leader John Key and the policy of the National party have made some difference with Labour managing to regain some lost ground.

In the 3 News poll, National looks to be firmly in control at 48 percent, while Labour sits steady at 35 percent.

Meanwhile the Greens have moved up to seven percent, followed by NZ First who nudge up to four percent, and looks set the crucial MMP threshold of five percent.

The Maori Party came in at two percent, followed by Act at one percent and trailing at 0.3 percent was United Future.

Using the figures from the poll, in parliament National would govern alone with 62 seats and could get help from Act or United Future if it needed.

Labour would have 45 seats and the Greens would have nine. The Maori Party would have four seats and Progressive one.

*The TV3 Poll is in stark contrast to the Roy Morgan Poll out Friday 18 July, which shows National in the lead from Labour by more than 20 points
Related Political Animal reading


c Political Animal 2008


Saturday, 19 July 2008

NZ HERALD & POLITICAL ANIMAL COMMENTARY: In search of John Key

According to yesterday's Roy Morgan Poll and a trend in polls going back to the end of last year, John Key looks like he is going to win the Prime Minister-ship of this once great country, New Zealand.
Inspirational where Helen Clark is confrontational, practical instead of academic, Key has the promise of the majority of Kiwis behind him, for a return to a prosperous, inclusive New Zealand, where hard work meant reward and welfare was reserved as a backstop not a lifestyle.

Motivating and leading individuals by example to achieve independence, success, wealth and a good life, an anathema to Helen Clark, her Cabinet and those that vote for her.

As the NZ Herald has reported though, we only know Key from some of the mud slung from the left and the fact that he came from an impoverished, poor background-unlike Helen Clark who was brought up in very comfortable surroundings and had an easy life- and worked his way to the top, principally because of his mother, who instilled in him the seed to get on in life.

Something sadly missing from our record numbers of families on welfare today.

People can see in him already the character of the struggling kiwi that once was and that we all have inside us, but need to let go of the State apron strings first to truly fly.

I'm quite excited by the promise to come for the country and hope he has the determination and will that has made his life such a success, from such humble beginnings, to inspire a whole country to get behind him and succeed individually, and to break the current slide into State dependence.

*The first part of the Herald story starts today and finishes next week with part two.
*Read: "Helen Clark: Absolute Power" by Ian Wishart


3:00PM Thursday June 19, 2008
By Eugene Bingham, Carroll du Chateau and Paula Oliver
A young John Key. Photo / Supplied

A young John Key. Photo / Supplied

John Key Timeline

* In three months John Key will be standing for the country's highest office
* Polls suggest that the 47-year-old will be New Zealand's next Prime Minister
* Yet he remains relatively unknown. Who really is John Key? Where did he come from and what motivates his ambition?

One day around 1971, John Key arrived home from school, flopped down his bag and made an announcement: "I'm going to learn to play golf."

He was about 10, a cheerful but unremarkable pupil at Cobham Intermediate. His family - mother Ruth and older sisters Liz and Sue - lived in a state house on Hollyford Ave in the Christchurch suburb of Burnside. Inside, the turquoise carpet was offset by orange and black sofas, the lounge cleaned and tidied to motel standard. There wasn't room to practise putting, let alone a chip shot, on the bare, sloping front yard.

The family blanched. "He might as well have said he wanted to fly to the moon as far as we were concerned," says Sue. "Mum said, 'Why do you want to do that? That's going to cost money!"'

John, the man of the house since his father died several years before and the light in his Jewish mother's eyes, sat down and explained himself.

"He'd figured out that business guys have golf lunches," says Sue. "He told us 'I have to start working on those skills now so when I need them they're in place'."This is one of hundreds of anecdotes the Weekend Herald gathered from scores of interviews for this project. His sisters spoke candidly about him after they were approached in the course of this inquiry, revealing family stories that even their famous brother wasn't aware of. The golf tale is a telling insight because it shows that Key, even as a child of 10, was driven and had calculated what he would have to do to achieve his goals.

The interesting thing about the Key family is that no-one tried to divert him from his golfing ambition. Ruth, who had worked nights to keep the money coming in, probably half expected it.

She would constantly tell the children, especially John: "You can do better than this; I expect you to work your way up in the world."

Step one in John Key's audacious plan was in place.

More than 35 years later, Key is making a bid to be prime minister. But who is he? Compared with others who have stood to lead the country, Key is a relative unknown. He swooped back into New Zealand six years ago, a multi-millionaire thanks to a lucrative investment bank career, then quickly rose to the top of the National Party. Poll ratings suggest he has a royal chance of seizing control.

For five months, the Weekend Herald has researched Key's background to ascertain the essence of the man. The picture which has emerged is of a person of driving ambition and determination who is prepared to do what it takes to achieve what he is aiming for. In pursuit of his goals, Key will not hesitate to seek out people he thinks are best-placed to help him. He is decisive and appears genuine, but at the same time does not like giving offence - it's this aspect of his character which, as we shall explore in part two next week, provides the ammunition for his political opponents to label him "Slippery John".


Related Political Animal reading

Pointing Fingers in the playground

Desperation by Labour backfires

What happened to risk?

Helen Clark's words ring hollow

c Political Animal 2008

Fairfax Nielson Poll: 19 July 2008

In what is possibly what Helen Clark would call a "rogue poll", Labour have closed to gap in the latest Fairfax/Nielson Poll. The trend has been a 20 point plus gap between Labour and National over the last 4 months with a couple of blips since sept 2007, so it is not as good for Labour as a look at today's single polling result might suggest.

Reinforcing that the Nielson poll might be a rogue one, the Roy Morgan Poll, out yesterday, continues the trend of a 20 plus point lead by National, the same trend established in the Nielson poll.

Poll watchers will be able to state a slip for support for National if there is a similar Nielson poll in August.

The Roy Morgan poll has been the more accurate one in predicting election results and the margins of the vote.


By TRACY WATKINS - The Dominion Post | Saturday, 19 July 2008

Labour has been thrown a lifeline by today's Fairfax Media-Nielsen poll showing the gap with National has closed to its narrowest since last year.

Though National would comfortably govern alone on today's poll results, Labour has clawed its way back from a 24-point deficit last month to 16 points today.

That may not be enough to turn around perceptions that the election is a foregone conclusion, but it has arrested a trend in which Labour's support fell below 30 per cent in the same poll last month, a result that shocked many Labour foot soldiers.

Prime Minister Helen Clark acknowledged Labour's recovery to 35 per cent would be a morale boost.

"I've been saying to people for a long time the feeling in the heartland was nothing like 29 or 30 per cent ... our people will be very motivated by these results."

Labour had been warned that its attacks on National leader John Key's credibility, including a holding of Tranz Rail shares and policies such as ACC, would backfire.

But today's poll shows the gap between Mr Key and Miss Clark as preferred prime minister narrowing to seven points, the closest since November, suggesting the attacks are having an effect.

And it reveals a lot of voters - 28 per cent - remain undecided about whom they would prefer as prime minister. Continued


Related Political Animal Reading

Roy Morgan Poll: 18 July 2008

c Political Animal 2008

Friday, 18 July 2008

Peter's admits lying about Glenn Donation

As pointed out in this blog last week Winston Peters lied about receiving money from billionaire Owen Glenn.

He has just been reported as saying minutes ago in the NZ Herald(story below) "he had only just found out about it" today, thereby admitting his lie, finally.

This is after he labeled Audrey Young from the Herald and the Herald itself liars for reporting that his party, NZ First, had accepted money from Glenn. Earlier this year, when it was discovered that Labour had received secret donations from Glenn, Peters was asked then if his party had received money as well, but he denied it.

His party and himself, strongly supported the Electoral Finance Act, that Peters purported that the act would, "stop big secret money from buying elections", only to accept large donations himself.

This individual has to go.

Pass me a bucket.



Peters: "I just found out Glenn gave me 100K"


8:14PM Friday July 18, 2008
Winston Peters. Photo / Mark Mitchell

Winston Peters. Photo / Mark Mitchell

New Zealand First leader Winston Peters said tonight expatriate billionaire Owen Glenn donated $100,000 towards a legal action he mounted after the 2005 election, but he denied the money was given to his party and said he had only just found out about it.

Since July 12, when the Weekend Herald published an email from Mr Glenn in which the business tycoon said he had given money to NZ First, Mr Peters has angrily denied that any was received.

He has called reporters liars and called for the resignation of the Herald's editor Tim Murphy and its political editor Audrey Young. Continued


Related Political Animal Reading

Winston's silence is telling
Labour gets tangled in Peter's lies
Leaked Glenn Email
Winston got secret donations from Owen Glenn
Electoral Finance Bill: The purpose is clear

c Political Animal 2008

Roy Morgan Poll : July 18 2008

The latest Roy Morgan Political Poll continues a trend started 12 months ago of a huge gap between National and Labour. The latest poll continues this trend.


Finding No. 4308 - Latest Roy Morgan Poll on New Zealand voter intention.: July 18, 2008

In mid July 2008 the New Zealand Roy Morgan Poll shows National Party support at 52% (up 0.5%) clearly ahead of the Labour Party 31% (up 0.5%), if an election were held now the National Party would win.

Support for the Greens was 7.5% (down 0.5%), NZ First 6.5% (up 2.5% to its highest level since September 2006), Maori Party 1% (down 1.5%), United Future 1% (unchanged) and ACT NZ 0.5% (down 1.5%).

The Roy Morgan Government Confidence Rating has fallen to a record low 87 (down 1) and the Roy Morgan New Zealand Consumer Confidence Rating although up 3.7 points, is also at a near record low 85.7.

Gary Morgan says:

“The latest New Zealand Roy Morgan Poll shows the Labour Government of Helen Clark (31%) failing to make any inroads into the lead of the National Party (52%).

“The Roy Morgan New Zealand Consumer Confidence Rating (85.7, up 3.7 points) remains near its record low with an equal record majority of New Zealanders (64%) saying they expect bad economic times over the next 12 months.

“These results present Helen Clark with a huge challenge to gain re-election. At the latest, the New Zealand Election must be held by early November and time is quickly running out for Clark to find away to connect with the electorate.”

Electors were asked: “If an election were held today which party would receive your party vote?

This latest Morgan Poll on voting intention was conducted by telephone with a New Zealand-wide cross-section of 871 electors from June 30 — July 13, 2008.

VOTING INTENTION SUMMARY

The following table compares the latest NZ Morgan Polls on Voting Intention with the result from the September 17, 2005 General Election:

PRIMARY VOTE

Labour

National

Progressive

Party

NZ First

Green

Party

United

Future

Maori

Party*

ACT NZ

Other

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

General Election, July 27, 2002

41.3

20.9

1.7

10.4

7

6.7

n/a

7.1

6.6

General Election, September 17, 2005

41.1

39.1

1.16

5.72

5.3

2.67

2.12

1.51

2.48

MORGAN POLL

September 20 - October 2, 2005

36.5

41.5

1

4.5

9

3

1

1.5

3

October 4-16, 2005
39
40.5
1 5 7 3.5 2 1.5 0.5
October 18-31, 2005
37.5 40 0.5 6 9 3.5 1 1 1.5
November 1-14, 2005
37.5 40 0.5 7 7 3 2 2 1
November 15-27, 2005
39 40.5 1 5.5 8.5 2 1 1.5 1
November 28 - December 9, 2005
40 40 0.5 6 7.5 2.5 1 1.5 1
January 4-12, 2006
40.5 42.5 0.5 4.5 6.5 1.5 2 0.5 1.5
January 13—23, 2006
39 40.5 0 4.5 8.5 3 1.5 1.5 1.5
January 24 - February 5, 2006
38.5 39 0.5 5.5 9.5 3 1.5 2.5 0
February 7-19, 2006
40 40 0.5 3.5 10 1.5 2.5 1.5

0.5

February 22 - March 6, 2006
43 39 0.5 4.5 7.5 1.5 1.5 1.5 1
March 7-19, 2006
42.5 41 0 3.5 7.5 2 2 1 0.5
March 20 - April 2, 2006
40 43 0.5 4.5 6.5 1.5 1.5 1 1.5
April 3-16, 2006
41.5 40 1 3.5 7 2 2 2.5 0.5
April 17-30, 2006
40.5 40.5 0.5 3.5 8.5 2.5 2.5 1.5 -
May 1-14, 2006
39.5 41 0.5 5 7.5 3 1 1.5 1
May 15-28, 2006
41 44 0.5 3 6.5 1.5 1.5 1 1
May 29 — June 11, 2006
40 44.5 - 4.5 6.5 2 1 1.5 -
June 12-25, 2006
37 45 0.5 5 6.5 1.5 2 1.5 1
July 3-16, 2006
43 39 - 4.5 8 2 1 1.5 1
July 17 - 30, 2006
40 42 - 3.5 8.5 2 2 1 1
July 31 - August 13, 2006
39 41 - 3.5 9 3 2 1.5 1
August 14-27, 2006
38.5 44 0.5 4 7 1 2.5 1.5 1
August 28 - September 10, 2006
41 38 0.5 5.5 8.5 2 3 1.5 ^
September 16 - October 1, 2006
36 41.5 - 7 8.5 2.5 2.5 1.5 0.5
October 2-15, 2006
40 40 ^ 5 8.5 1.5 1.5 2 1.5
October 16-29, 2006
38.5 41 ^ 3 8 3 2.5 1.5 2.5
October 30 — November 12, 2006
38.5 42.5 0.5 5 7.5 1.5 2.5 0.5 1.5
November 13 - 26, 2006
37.5 42.5 ^ 4.5 8 3 2 1.5 1
November 27 - December 12, 2006
37.5 44.5 0.5 4 9.5 2 1 0.5 0.5
January 3-21, 2007
41 41 0.5 4 7.5 1 2 1.5 1.5
January 23 - February 5, 2007
39.5 41.5 0.5 4 8 1.5 2 2.5 0.5
February 6-18, 2007
36 48.5 ^ 3 8.5 1.5 1.5 1 -
February 19 - March 4, 2007
36 45 0.5 2 8.5 1.5 3.5 2.5 0.5
March 5-18, 2007
37.5 45 ^ 4 7.5 1.5 3.5 1 -
March 19 - April 2, 2007
35.5 46 ^ 3.5 9.5 1 2.5 1 1
April 3-16, 2007
33.5 45.5 ^ 6 8.5 2 2 1 1.5
April 23 - May 6, 2007
36 49.5 ^ 4.5 6 1.5 1.5 0.5 0.5
May 7-20, 2007
32 49 0.5 4.5 7 1.5 2.5 1.5 1.5
May 21 - June 3, 2007
33.5 50.5 - 3.5 6.5 2 1.5 2 0.5
June 4-17, 2007
36 49.5 0.5 3 6.5 0.5 1.5 1.5 1
June 18 - July 1, 2007
34 48.5 1 2.5 8.5 1.5 2 1 1
July 2-15, 2007
36 47 0.5 5 6.5 1 2 1.5 0.5
July 16-29, 2007
35 49 0.5 4 6 0.5 3 0.5 1.5
July 30 - August 12, 2007
31 50.5 0.5 4 7 2 3 1.5 0.5
August 20 - September 2, 2007
34 48 0.5 2.5 9.5 0.5 3 1 1
September 3-16, 2007
35 49 ^ 2.5 7.5 1 3 1.5 0.5
September 17-30, 2007
33 48.5 0.5 3 9.5 1.5 2.5 1 0.5
October 1-14, 2007
39 45.5 ^ 3 7.5 1.5 2 0.5 1
October 15-28, 2007
40.5 45 ^ 3.5 6.5 1.5 1.5 1 0.5
October 29-Novmber 11, 2007
34 48 ^ 5.5 7.5 1 2.5 1 0.5
November 12-25, 2007
35 48 0.5 5 6.5 0.5 2.5 1.5 0.5
November 26-December 9, 2007
34.5 47.5 0.5 5 6 1.5 2 2

1

January 3-20, 2008
33.5 52 0.5 3.5 6.5 0.5 2 1 0.5
January 21-February 3, 2008
36.5 45.5 0.5 4 9 0.5 1.5 2 0.5
February 4-17, 2008
32.5 51.5 0.5 3 8 0.5 3 0.5 0.5
February 18-March 2, 2008
35
49.5
0.5
4
7
0.5
2
1
0.5
March 3-16, 2008
34
51
0.5
3
6.5
1
2
2
0.5
March 24-April 6, 2008
34.5
47
0.5
4
9
0.5
3
1.5
^
April 7 - 20, 2008
35.5
50
^
3.5
6.5
0.5
2.5
1.5
^
April 21 - May 4, 2008
35.5
49.5
^
4.5
6.5
1
2
1
^
May 5-18, 2008
35
49
^
4
7.5
0.5
2.5
1
0.5
May 19 - June 1, 2008
32
50.5
0.5
4
7
1
3
1.5
0.5
June 2 - 15, 2008
31.5
52.5
^
4
7
0.5
2
2
0.5
June 16 - 29, 2008
30.5 51.5 ^ 4 8 1 2.5 2 0.5
June 30-July 13, 2008
31 52 0.5 6.5 7.5 1 1 0.5 ^

*The Maori Party was launched in July 2004; ^ Result less than 0.5%

The Morgan Poll was the most accurate in predicting the small margin between the two major parties (a Labour lead of 1.5%) for the September 2005 General Election.

New Zealand Regional Voting Intention Summary

Auckland

MORGAN POLL

Labour

National

Progressive

Alliance

NZ

First

Green

Party

United

Future

Maori

Party*

ACT NZ

Other

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

July 2006

38

44.5

0.5

5.5

6

2

1.5

1.5

0.5

August 2006

38.5

43.5

^

3

8.5

2.5

2

1.5

0.5

September 2006

41

41.5

0.5

2.5

8

2.5

1.5

1.5

1

October 2006

35

44.5

^

5

9.5

2

2

2

^

November 2006

33

47

0.5

5.5

8

1.5

2.5

1.5

0.5

December 2006

36

46

^

4

9

1.5

2

1

0.5

January 2007

38

44

0.5

3.5

7.5

1.5

2

1.5

1.5

February 2007

34.5

49.5

0.5

3.5

6.5

0.5

1

3

1

March 2007

37.5

46

^

2.5

8

1.5

2.5

1.5

0.5

April 2007

35.5

45

^

2.5

10

2

2.5

2

0.5

May 2007

35

48

^

3.5

7

2

3

0.5

1

June 2007

30.5

54.5

^

3.5

6.5

1

1

2

1

July 2007

32.5

52

^

2

5.5

2

3

2

1

August 2007

30

53

^

4.5

6.5

1.5

2.5

1

1

September 2007

32.5

54.5

^

2

6.5

^

3.5

0.5

0.5

October 2007

35.5

51

^

2.5

6.5

1

2.5

1

^

November 2007

36

50

^

5

4.5

0.5

2.5

1

0.5

December 2007

33.5

51.5

^

4

5

1

2

2.5

0.5

January 2008

34

52

^

4

7

0.5

1

1.5

^

February 2008

36

48

0.5

2.5

8

0.5

2

2

0.5

March 2008

32.5

52

0.5

3

7.5

1

1.5

1.5

0.5

April 2008

32.5

51

^

3.5

8.5

^

1.5

2.5

0.5

May 2008

33.5

51.5

^

4

6.5

1

2

1

0.5

June 2008

32

51.5

0.5

3.5

7

0.5

2.5

2

0.5

Wellington

MORGAN POLL

Labour

National

Progressive

Alliance

NZ

First

Green

Party

United

Future

Maori

Party*

ACT NZ

Other

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

July — August 2006

47.5

36

^

2.5

7.5

1.5

2

2

1

September — October 2006

50

32.5

0.5

1.5

8

2

1.5

2.5

1.5

November — December 2006

44.5

36.5

^

1.5

9

3.5

2

1.5

1.5

January — February 2007

44

38

0.5

1.5

11.5

1

2

1

0.5

March — April 2007

41.5

38.5

^

4

8.5

2

4

0.5

1

May — June 2007

36.5

43.5

^

3

10.5

2

2

1.5

1

July — August 2007

40.5

41.5

0.5

2.5

9

2

2.5

1.5

^

September — October 2007

39.5

38

1

2.5

13.5

2

2

1

0.5

November — December 2007

34

41

0.5

3

13

2

2.5

2.5

1.5

January — February 2008

39.5

42

^

3.5

10

0.5

3

1

0.5

March — April 2008

40

43.5

^

1.5

11.5

0.5

1.5

1

0.5

May — June 2008

38

44.5

^

3

9

1

1.5

2.5

0.5

Christchurch

MORGAN POLL

Labour

National

Progressive

Alliance

NZ

First

Green

Party

United

Future

Maori

Party*

ACT NZ

Other

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

July — August 2006

42

41

^

2.5

10

2

0.5

1

0.5

September — October 2006

39

40

0.5

6.5

8

1.5

0.5

2.5

1.5

November — December 2006

43.5

36.5

1

5

8.5

2.5

0.5

2

1

January — February 2007

38

40

1

3

11

2.5

1

2.5

1

March — April 2007

33.5

43.5

1

6

10

2.5

1

1.5

1

May — June 2007

38

47.5

1

2.5

6.5

1

1.5

1

1

July — August 2007

36

46

1.5

5

7

1.5

1

^

2

September — October 2007

43

42.5

0.5

1

8

1

2

1

1

November — December 2007

39

47.5

1

3.5

7

0.5

0.5

1

^

January — February 2008

29

57

1

3

8

0.5

1

0.5

^

March — April 2008

39.5

44

1

2

8.5

1

1.5

1.5

1

May — June 2008

38

49.5

^

3.5

6.5

0.5

1

0.5

0.5

Other North Island

MORGAN POLL

Labour

National

Progressive

Alliance

NZ

First

Green

Party

United

Future

Maori

Party*

ACT NZ

Other

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

July — August 2006

36.5

43.5

^

6

7

2

3

1.5

0.5

September — October 2006

34.5

42

^

8

7.5

1.5

4.5

1.5

0.5

November — December 2006

35.5

44.5

^

5

7

2.5

3.5

1

1

January — February 2007

37

45

^

5.5

6

1.5

3.5

1

0.5

March — April 2007

32

49.5

^

5

6.5

1

4

1.5

0.5

May — June 2007

33.5

51.5

^

5.5

4.5

1.5

2

1

0.5

July — August 2007

32

50

0.5

4.5

7

1

3.5

1

0.5

September — October 2007

32

49

^

4.5

8.5

1

4

0.5

0.5

November — December 2007

35.5

46.5

^

6

5.5

1

3.5

1

1

January — February 2008

32

50

0.5

4.5

7

0.5

4

0.5

1

March — April 2008

31

51.5

^

6

5.5

0.5

4

1

0.5

May — June 2008

31

51.5

^

5

6

0.5

4

1.5

0.5

Other South Island

MORGAN POLL

Labour

National

Progressive

Alliance

NZ

First

Green

Party

United

Future

Maori

Party*

ACT NZ

Other

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

July — August 2006

41

40.5

^

3

11

2.5

0.5

^

1.5

September — October 2006

43.5

42

^

3.5

7

2

1

1

^

November — December 2006

40.5

42.5

1

2.5

9

3

1

^

0.5

January — February 2007

46.5

40.5

^

1.5

8.5

1.5

^

0.5

1

March — April 2007

40

44

^

3

10

1

1

0.5

0.5

May — June 2007

36

49.5

^

3

7

1

1

1.5

1

July — August 2007

38

46

1

3

7

1

1.5

0.5

2

September — October 2007

35.5

49.5

^

1.5

8.5

2

1

1.5

0.5

November — December 2007

39

44.5

^

5

9

2

^

0.5

^

January — February 2008

34.5

51

^

3.5

9

0.5

^

1

0.5

March — April 2008

40.5

49.5

^

1.5

5

1.5

1.5

^

0.5

May — June 2008

33

52

^

3.5

9.5

0.5

1

0.5

^

NEW ZEALAND: HEADING IN “RIGHT” OR “WRONG” DIRECTION?

Electors were asked: Generally speaking, do you feel that things in New Zealand are heading in the right direction or would you say things are seriously heading in the wrong direction?


New Zealand Roy Morgan Government Confidence Rating: Interviewing Dates


Aug 20-Sep 2,

2007

Sep 3-16,

2007

Sep 17-30,

2007

Oct 1-14,

2007

Oct 15-28,

2007

Oct 29-Nov 11,

2007

Nov 12-25,

2007

Nov 26-Dec 9,

2007

Jan 3-20,

2008

Jan 21-Feb 3,

2008

Feb 4-17,

2008


%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

Right direction

51.5

54

49.5

53

50.5

43.5

47

47.5

46.5

46

47

Wrong direction

35.5

32.5

34.5

32

33

37.5

37

38

39

38.5

41

Roy Morgan GCR#

116

121.5

115

121

117.5

106

110

109.5

107.5

107.5

106

Can’t say

13

13.5

16

15

16.5

19

16

14.5

14.5

15.5

12

Total

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

# Roy Morgan GCR = Roy Morgan Government Confidence Rating (The Roy Morgan GCR is 100 plus the difference between the percentage of New Zealanders who say the country is “heading in the right direction” and the percentage who say the country is “seriously heading in the wrong direction”).


New Zealand Roy Morgan Government Confidence Rating: Interviewing Dates


Feb 18-Mar 2,

2008

Mar 3-16,

2008

Mar 24- Apr 6,

2008

Apr 7-20,

2008

April 21-May 4, 2008

May 5-18,

2008

May 19-June 1, 2008 June 2-15, 2008 June 16-29, 2008 June 30-July 13, 2008

%

% % % % % % % % %

Right direction

52.5

45.5 47.5 50.5 44.5 38 38 42.5 37 36.5

Wrong direction

34

37.5 37.5 34.5 40.5 44.5 44.5 40.5 49 49.5

Roy Morgan GCR#

118.5

108 110 116 104.5 93.5 93.5 102 88 87

Can’t say

13.5

17 15 15 15 17.5 17.5 17 14 14

Total

100

100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100

# Roy Morgan GCR = Roy Morgan Government Confidence Rating (The Roy Morgan GCR is 100 plus the difference between the percentage of New Zealanders who say the country is “heading in the right direction” and the percentage who say the country is “seriously heading in the wrong direction”).

For further information:

Gary Morgan: Office +61 3 9224 5213 Mobile +61 411 129 094

Michele Levine: Office +61 3 9224 5215 Mobile +61 411 129 093

Margin of Error

The margin of error to be allowed for in any estimate depends mainly on the number of interviews on which it is based. The following table gives indications of the likely range within which estimates would be 95% likely to fall, expressed as the number of percentage points above or below the actual estimate. The figures are approximate and for general guidance only, and assume a simple random sample.

Sample Size

Percentage Estimate

40%-60%

25% or 75%

10% or 90%

5% or 95%

500

±4.5

±3.9

±2.7

±1.9

1,000

±3.2

±2.7

±1.9

±1.4

Finding No. 4308 is taken from Computer Report No. 2253

The Morgan Poll is conducted by the ONLY Australian and New Zealand member of the Gallup International Association.

No other public opinion poll taken in Australia or New Zealand has this qualification.